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The Medical Pathway

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Healthcare is about more than getting a diagnosis - patients need ongoing support and management is often a life-long journey.

 

And yet 72% of endometriosis patients were not given any written information when diagnosed.

 

No plan is one size fits all and it all depends on your priorities: be that relieving specific symptoms - physical or mental, your career, caring responsibilities, and whether you want to conceive or not. The right treatment for you might vary at different points in your life.
 

 

What do you use to manage endo?

 

Management

Heat

Pain relief

Hormones

Surgery

Mental Health

Self care

Fertility

Physiotherapy

Sex

Community

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Self care is all about prioritising your well-being. There are lots of ways of doing it - from little every day actions to big undertakings.

 

For some people, that might look like drinking enough water or spending time in nature, for others it may be standing up for your employment rights or finding a doctor or therapist who listens.

Surgery can be used to remove endometriomas and cysts, and divide adhesions - this is often done at the same time as the diagnostic laparoscopy.

 

There are different methods including the use of scissors, lasers or heat. Ablation is the removal of surface lesions, excision is cutting them out at the root. Surgery can also be used to improve fertility.

81% of patients said endometriosis has impacted their mental health negatively or very negatively.

 

Having endometriosis can come with lots of feelings of depression, anxiety, loneliness, guilt, low self-esteem, trauma. Help is out there.

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